Entrepreneurship, Finance, Motivation

Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Is the Book as Life-Changing as People Claim?

Robert Kiyosaki’s 1997 bestseller Rich Dad, Poor Dad seems to be a cult-classic in the world of financial literacy. As I was learning the basics of finance, this book popped up everywhere. Every blog, YouTube video, and Google search kept pulling up Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

So I conceded and bought the book. (It’s only $6.69 on Amazon!) In the spirit of the book reviews I’ve done on this blog previously of classic book, I thought I’d review this one as well. Turns out, I think these recommendations were warranted. Was it life-changing? Yes… but

Kiyosaki explains his basic financial principles in short stories. As a child, he grew up with a PhD-educated government-employee father who made just enough money to survive. He spent quite a bit of time at his best friend’s house where his father was a dropout-with-financial-intuition business owner. He juxtaposes their advice to show what we all can learn about financial literacy.

Before I continue, Kiyosaki poses this us versus them sort of mentality when it comes describing the “rich” and the “poor.” While I know these terms are for shock factor, they’re most certainly stereotypes. What he really means when he says “poor” is “a person who isn’t good with their finances” and when he says “rich” is “a person who is good with their finances.” Okay, now that’s out of the way, let’s get into the meat and potatoes.

Kiyosaki divides his book up into lessons which are useful in getting you to think critically about your financial position. He focuses on basic principles like accumulating more assets than liabilities and learning to look for financial opportunities. He sprinkles in anecdotes (that may or may not be true) to make the book read like a story.

Love him or hate him, Kiyosaki is a good storyteller. He weaves the words of the rich dad with the poor dad to create a cohesive narrative that learning to have your money work for you, rather than working for someone else is the key to amassing riches.

And quite frankly, he’s not wrong. If you’re capable of it (and most of us are), accumulating wealth is learning to have your dollars be your employees. However, is there any real advice for how to start that? Not really.

This book is nothing short of a gateway drug. It’s not meant to teach you how to get rich, it’s meant to teach you to be money-minded. As long as you keep your notepad at the door, this book can be life-changing.

Have any of you read this book before? And for those that haven’t would you pick it up?

Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Goodreads

Motivation, Productivity

What’s Next for This Blog

Hello! I know it’s been a little while, but I’m back! I’ve taken my time returning because I was processing changes that were happening around me. I’ve written this post several times over. But I’m okay and so is everyone around me. Let’s talk.

Reflection

Over the past month, I’ve been thinking. Like really deeply thinking about my happiness and my future goals. A reflection period I’ve put off for so long – thinking that one day my plans would just fall right in to place. I suppose in some way that was right since I fell into this growing period seemingly unprovoked.

It was then that I realized that a lot of the projects that I had created on this blog gave me short-term happiness. I was happy to do these things because I had a work product to share, but quickly realized it didn’t progress me anywhere besides acquiring a new skill.

In my self-induced hibernation, I realized what this blog has actually meant for me. I realized that these projects I was doing were setting me up for my next big thing. I was learning valuable skills like how to create a website, how to write, and how to schedule my day to be most productive.

As someone who is extremely career-oriented, I realized that while these projects weren’t wasting my time – I was learning new skills and gaining confidence in myself – but they were a huge opportunity cost. If I spent time working on my future career(s), I could have put myself a little farther.

While you all know me as a law student and aspiring lawyer, that’s not entirely who I am. I’m not actually sure I want to be a lawyer. I’ve put myself on this path to become a lawyer since I was a kid, not actually thinking about what that meant. I don’t really see myself as a 9-5 kind of person. Not that I don’t respect 9-5 jobs or think less of them, I just think I want to own my own business and accrue my own wealth. The problem I’ve always had is what business?

I realize that my primary interest is learning how to be self-sufficient. To me, self-sufficiency is owning my own business, growing wealth, and chasing actual goals. I hop from idea to idea because I am naturally curious and value consistent self-improvement.

This has been growing in me for years. I’ve mentioned before that I have a background in start-ups. I started this blog with the idea of trying many projects. I chase a career in patents and gravitate towards those who innovate. All the puzzle pieces were there, I just wasn’t able to connect them until now. This is what lights my fire: innovation and creation.

What’s Next

So, where does that leave this blog? I mulled it over for a while because I didn’t want to rush into something I couldn’t (or didn’t want to) maintain. But this blog has been a strong source of accountability and motivation for me. I share ideas and thoughts on here that only those in my innermost circles know. I like that.

I have decided to pivot this blog to follow my hustles and side-hustles. I want to show the ups and downs of me learning to be self-sufficient. My ultimate career goal is passive income from multiple income streams. I want to learn about options that don’t involve a cubicle or eight hours of my day, and I want to learn together.

I’m not talking about writing about motivation and creating “hustle porn.” You’re not going to see cheesy inspirational quotes or anything. I want to focus on the realities of exploring and experiencing these ventures. Motivation is irrelevant if you don’t capitalize on it. I want to talk about where this journey actually takes me: through the good, the bad, and the ugly.

I also want to continue projects that acquire skills. These can be used in later business moves. It’s always relevant to learn something new. I have a Slumdog Millionaire kind of perspective on things: everything always comes back to help you in some way. However, some of the projects I’ve begun on this blog will probably be paused until later notice. They may come back in the future, but not until I get a few other things going.

Expect to see some changes in this site over the next few days. I’ll be shifting into its next phase. I know that this isn’t necessarily the content that you came for, but if you’ve made it this far – thank you. No hard feelings if this isn’t for you and you don’t want to read this new content. I know it’s kind of a 180. But thanks for the support to get me here.

We’ll talk again soon.

Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Goodreads